What happens when you type in a URL in browser?

In a simplified way:

  1. browser checks cache; if requested object is in cache and is fresh, skip to #9
  2. browser asks OS for server’s IP address
  3. OS makes a DNS lookup and replies the IP address to the browser
  4. browser opens a TCP connection to server (this step is much more complex with HTTPS)
  5. browser sends the HTTP request through TCP connection
  6. browser receives HTTP response and may close the TCP connection, or reuse it for another request
  7. browser checks if the response is a redirect (3xx result status codes), authorization request (401), error (4xx and 5xx), etc.; these are handled differently from normal responses (2xx)
  8. if cacheable, response is stored in cache
  9. browser decodes response (e.g. if it’s gzipped)
  10. browser determines what to do with response (e.g. is it a HTML page, is it an image, is it a sound clip?)
  11. browser renders response, or offers a download dialog for unrecognized types

You can  get more information here.

What does TCP/IP stand for?

TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) is the basic communication language or protocol of the Internet. It can also be used as a communications protocol in a private network (either an intranet or an extranet). When you are set up with direct access to the Internet, your computer is provided with a copy of the TCP/IP program just as every other computer that you may send messages to or get information from also has a copy of TCP/IP.

What does UDP stand for?

UDP (User Datagram Protocol) is an alternative communications protocol to Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) used primarily for establishing low-latency and loss tolerating connections between applications on the Internet. Both UDP and TCP run on top of the Internet Protocol (IP) and are sometimes referred to as UDP/IP or TCP/IP. Both protocols send short packets of data, called datagrams.